Thanks, Ed. And thanks a lot, Sony Pictures.

As a tech security reporter, I have long sought a catalytic moment, during which non-insiders start truly caring about how to maintain their safety and privacy online. And at some point between June 2013, when Edward Snowden’s U.S. government leaks were first reported, and December 2014, when hacks of Sony’s film studio occupied the front pages of newspapers for three weeks straight, people like you began to pay attention.

The premise of The Parallax—a fancy reference to the notion that as you learn, your opinion changes—is to identify and demystify today’s most important security and privacy stories. Is your iPhone really at risk of being hacked by malicious ads? Why is the U.S. government fighting encryption like it’s the second coming of Satan? Which new technologies will most effectively detect and block identity theft? Could any technology protect you during the next school shooting—or, better yet, prevent it?

We seek to answer these questions, as well as uncover others that will matter to you. Our stories will focus on analyzing the news, exploring in depth the latest risks, helping you figure out how to best protect yourself when connected to the Net, and profiling the colorful cast of characters populating the security and privacy world.

From breaking news to opinions to in-depth features, we’ll publish a variety of content written by a feisty cadre of journalists. Some will focus on innovative technology, such as our story today about a new way to protect online conversations. Others will dig into headline backstories, such as our report on the potential pitfalls of a cyberthreat information-sharing bill circulating around the U.S. Senate. And yet others will explore core concepts of security and privacy, such as our interview with futurist comic book writer and novelist Greg Rucka.

The Parallax is funded by a single sponsor, antivirus software maker Avast. You can read about our relationship in our Editorial Disclosure statement. Online journalism is evolving, and I believe Avast’s contractual promises to not interfere with The Parallax’s editorial direction.

Getting assigned the security and privacy beat used to be a tech journalist’s kiss of death. For me, it has been an honor. Through The Parallax, I look forward to developing a relationship with readers equally intent on better understanding what matters most to us. Please feel free to reach out to me with questions and suggestions at seth@the-parallax.com.

Sincerely,

Seth Rosenblatt

Editor, The Parallax